The Brotherhood of the Dragon

Strange things are happening at Stamford House.

It was not that Mr Fortey was particularly loved, but that he died in such a horrible way, and in the presence of almost the entire household. We must have been only a few feet away, yet no one heard or saw anything. If it could happen to a strapping veteran like the footman, it could happen to any of us.

Phil Hore’s debut novel crackles with thrills and chills as two unlikely allies join forces with two of history’s greatest writers, Arthur Conan Doyle and Bram Stoker, to save England from the ancient Brotherhood of the Dragon and the horrible secret they protect.

Born in 1969, Phil likes to point out he was one of the last children born before man walked on the moon. Working at Australia’s National Dinosaur Museum since 2000 and as an educator at the Australian War Memorial since 2006, he has previously worked at Questacon Science centre and could be seen haunting the halls and specimen rooms of London’s Natural History Museum and The Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. Here he even played famed palaeontologist O. C. Marsh during the Smithsonian’s centenary celebrations, and when asked why the 19th century palaeontologist was speaking with an Australian accent, happily pointed out that everyone on the 19th century spoke with an Australian accent. Published in newspapers and magazines across the globe, since 2007 Phil has been the paleo-author for the world’s longest running dinosaur magazine, The Prehistoric Times. He has also been a comic shop manager, a cinema projectionist, a theatre technician and gutted chickens for a deli. All of these influences seem to make an appearance in his writing, especially the chicken guts bit.

Book Details

ISBN: 978-1925652604 (pbk) | 978-1925652611 (ebook)

Category: Historical Fiction / Paranormal

Trade paperback: 252 pages

Publication Date: 18 February 2019

RRP: AU $23.95 (pbk) | $5.99 (ebook)

 


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